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Gamelang Preanger, ca. 1870 ~ by ‘Woodbury & Page’

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Gamelang Preanger, ca. 1870

Original late 19th-century photograph by ‘Woodbury & Page’, mounted on cardboard, matted.

‘Woodbury & Page’ can be considered the most important and most prolific photographic firm to have operated in Netherlands Indies, now Indonesia, in the nineteenth century. Founded in the late 1850s by Walter Bentley Woodbury and James Page, this firm continued to operate long after their departure and under various owners, into the early twentieth century.

Gamelan
is the traditional ensemble music of Java and Bali in Indonesia, made up predominantly of percussive instruments. The most common instruments used are metallophones played by mallets and a set of hand-played drums called kendhang which registers the beat. Other instruments include xylophones, bamboo flutes, a bowed instrument called a rebab, and even vocalists called sindhen.

Although the popularity of gamelan has declined since the introduction of pop music, gamelan is still commonly played on formal occasions and in many traditional Indonesian ceremonies. For most Indonesians, gamelan is an integral part of Indonesian culture.

Preanger, the vast volcanic mountainous region of inland West Java is traditionally known as Parahyangan (also known as Priangan or Preanger) which means “The abode of hyangs (gods)”. It is considered as the heartland of the Sundanese people.

 

Measurements: 19 x 23 cm
Condition: Scratched
Price: 7,500,000 IDR.

 

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